‘Everything you need to know about agri tyre repairs’

Specifically aimed at farmers and agricultural contractors, Michelin has produced a free downloadable guide entitled ‘What You Need to Know About Agricultural Tyre Repairs’.

The “easy-to-understand” booklet details the essentials to be aware of before starting an agricultural tyre repair job including:

  • When a repair should be considered;
  • If a temporary repair is suitable and for how long;
  • Choosing hot or cold vulcanising repair techniques;
  • How to spot the danger signs of a botched repair job and how to contact an accredited repairer.

Commenting, Martyn Pointer, Commercial Director for Michelin’s agricultural division in the UK, Ireland and Nordic markets, said: “Farm tyres represent a significant outlay and they need to deliver a long life in service.

Michelin

“A poor-quality repair can cost dearly if it leads to additional machine downtime, and leaving a temporary repair in for too long can void your tyre warranty altogether.

“We’ve created this guide so farmers and contractors have key information on tyre repair to hand, helping protect the equipment that holds up their machinery – and business.”Michelin

To download the guide, visit the Michelin website or tweet @MichelinAgriUK for a copy.

In other Michelin news, the company recently launched a “new generation” of agricultural tyre – the RoadBib. It, says the company, was co-designed with agricultural contractors and is claimed to “define a brand new segment of the tyre market”.

Expected to be available early in 2018, Michelin says it will become the first tyre for 200hp+ agricultural tractors designed specifically to give high performance, traction and longevity on machines driven intensively on roads.

According to the tyre giant, high-powered tractor fleets of agricultural and construction contractors usually spend more than 50% of their time on the road – equating to 80% of their total distance covered. In addition, they are often coupled to big, heavy trailers, which adds to the stress on the tyres.

According to engineers in the research and development department at Michelin, the objective was to create a solution that would work predominantly on tarmac and hard soil roads, providing high traction and longevity, in addition to performing well in fields on soft soil.

Michelin RoadBib