Reseeding and weed advice at Beef 14

It takes about 11 months for a new sward to establish; therefore the management of the reseed in this period is important. Reseeding will be one of a number of key topics covered at Beef 2014. Teagasc staff in the Grassland Department, Dairy and Beef Specialist teams in Moorepark have done extensive research on reseeding.

It notes reseeding levels in Ireland are low. Less than 2 per cent of our annual grassland area is reseeded annually. As grass is our main feed during the main grazing season, and the primary source of winter forage in the form of grass silage, the low level of reseeding must be addressed.

All the benefits of reseeding can be lost after sowing due to:
• Poor soil fertility – poor establishment and tillering
• Grazing at high grass covers or cutting for silage – tiller/plant death
• Weed infestation (especially docks)– loss of ground cover
• Pest attack (frit fly, leatherjackets and slugs) – tiller/plant death
• Poaching – don’t damage new reseeds.

Teagasc advisor Tim O’Donovan will look at weed control, including applying herbicide, the control of docks and how to decide what product is best for your situation. He will also take farmers through annual and perennial weed control, including fumitory and fat hen, as well as docks, dandelions and creeping thistle. He will also talk about how to get the most from spraying.

Teagasc staff in the Grassland Department, Dairy and Beef Specialist teams in Moorepark have done extensive research on reseeding. It notes that reseeding levels in Ireland are low. Less than 2% of our annual grassland area is reseeded annually. As grass is our main feed during the main grazing season, and the primary source of winter forage in the form of grass silage, the low level of reseeding must be addressed.

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